Tuesday, May 22, 2012

**UPDATE! She still sits and waits for the family that never came...



***UPDATE!! Anya's family has found her! Hooray!!!



An American family was coming for Anya, but they could not proceed. Anya, who is HIV+, still believes the family is coming for her, and she waits for them every day.

Please take a chance and link this to your facebook, even if you have never done that before. This is how families are found. It's how Tatiana's family found her (her new mom's coworker had posted a link to RR on facebook), and it might be how Anya's family finds her. One day, her mama and papa will walk through the doors of the orphanage and find her waiting.


(Anya is five years old; don't let the "14" next to her name fool you... that's just a code number for the orphanage.)

Click here for more information on Anya.





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18 comments:

  1. Oh my gosh she's so sweet. I love her! Why doesn't she have a donate buton??

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  2. I wasn't aware that they told children so early in the adoption process about their new family...I'm wondering if you know of anything knew with Jack? As you know my brother is overseas and hasn't been able to give me updates. I would check their family blog for myself but I lost the link.

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  3. Sonja, some kids never get a donate button, and sometimes it's because the orphanage wants a family to commit before they will give out more info, and RR is not allowed (I think) to raise funds for them. It's what happened to Nico, and it's frustrating. Not totally sure. There is an official RR facebook page you might want to join, and there is a lot of info and discussion there.

    Becky, I will try to find it!

    Also, I am not sure why Anya was told so early. Maybe a worker let it slip? I think it should never be said until the family's first visit….

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  4. Becky, just heard from the RR facebook page that she is doing well, has been active on facebook and is pursuing the adoption of Jack! :)

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    1. I know you were asking Leila, but if it's okay, I'd like to give my thoughts. . . We felt strongly that we were being led to a certain Eastern European country when we adopted - for many reasons - our fourth child, our first adoption. We discussed almost every country (including the US) when we were discerning God's will for us - and we had watched several families suffer badly at the hands of the US Foster care system - one family we know had three children placed with them and was told the adoption would be finalized in 5 months. 5 YEARS later, after many, damaging visits with bio parents as the court reversed gears and sought reunification over termination, the adoption was finalized and the family had to move due to threats from the bio family. Another couple we know arrived in court for the final hearing of two children who had been in their custody for two years - one since birth - only to find a new judge was hearing the case that day - a judge who never favored adoption - and ordered the immediate surrender of the children to the bio family - no transition, no appeal. . . And this family, too, lives in the shadows due to threats from the bio families of children they have fostered. . . With three young children in our home - we didn't feel the time was right to take those kind of risks. And we felt, too, that the Biblical command to care for orphans gives no restrictions - not just Christian orphans, not just orphans in your own country, not just orphans of the same heritage - just ORPHANS. And God confirmed to us many times over that we were on the right path to our son - who sits on the living room floor playing Sorry Sliders with his father, sister, and brother as I type this. . . :-) However, we have kept our foster license open (getting one is a homestudy requirement in our state) and are willing to accept younger foster children from our area into our home. Because a command is a command - and we all need to do what we are capable of doing. . .

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    2. Jennifer, you are a strong woman! When I read what you wrote, it just makes me so screaming mad. So much needless heartache and frustration. And always the children who pay the price. Horrible, horrible.

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  6. Hi Julie! It's a great question, with a few answers that may or may not satisfy you. So, let me try to answer as best I can.

    1. I am very much concerned about domestic kids and those in foster care who are available for adoption right now. In fact, in the past week, my friend Elisabeth (who is adopting overseas) told me of a ten-year-old boy in our state who love his Catholic faith and needs a forever home. Within minutes of my putting that out on facebook, a friend of mine stepped forward with her husband and they have started a homestudy to adopt that very boy. And just last night, I found several sibling groups in town that need a home now, and sent that off to another family here in town. I do advocate for those children. I know many folks in my circle who have adopted foster children here in the US. It is a beautiful thing.

    2. While the foster children here have a shot at a good life after they age out (it's America, and I've seen foster kids go on to great success in life), the kids in other nations do not have ANY hope at all. They may not even have a chance to stay alive. There is great need here, for sure, and there is also great need (just to live!) elsewhere.

    3. I do not pit one group of children against another, as if one is more deserving. I think all children should be loved and cared for, with families, not just a certain group or a certain region. ALL children are worthy of being known and loved. Your question to me is sort of like, "Why do you send donations to Haiti or Ethiopia for starving children when there are hungry kids right here in America?" Why would I have to pick and choose between them? Should we do our best to help everyone, in the best way we can and the best way we know how?

    4. I can't tell you why God placed this passion on my heart to advocate for RR children with special needs. You will have to ask Him. We all have different callings. Is your calling to advocate for (and adopt) older foster kids with special needs in America? I hope it is, and I say more power to you! I will be pleased to support you and pray for you in your endeavor, with no judgements as to why you do not focus on the kids rotting in Bulgaria or Eastern Europe, half-starved, never seeing the outside.

    Your last line says it all… you can be their advocate, and I hope you will. We all have a voice! God bless you in your efforts!

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  7. Just to add to your thought, Leila--correct me if I'm wrong as I may well be--but until RR started, these children in the orphanages were pretty much unknown due to lack of exposure, isn't that true? I remember hearing from Jerry and Susan when they were in the beginning of the adoption process with Alex that he was being transferred into a mental institution because he "aged out". I remember not really believing them, that just sounded too outrageous to put a child in a mental institution! It actually took me a really long time to truly believe that they were telling the truth, that there was no exaggeration in this. For myself, this is why I tend to advocate in my small way for the children overseas.

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  8. Foster care system here is a mess to be blunt. Judges give parents more and more chances for possibly years and burn out people who really do love kids. It took over 2.5 years to adopt our son from the US system. He was 3 months old when we got him from the hospital. There is something very sick about people fighting for a child who may or may not need help when kids are dying while being neglected overseas. Also, yes we have many foster kids posted for adoption and it looks bad, but did you know that they MUST post kids even if they have the foster family who wants the child. ( yep its messed up) one child we looked at had over 200 homestudies sent in. The time frame of wondering and waiting is draining when you think a child elsewhere needs you NOW>

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  9. Becky, I think you are right. And the "aging out" in the international systems can occur at age 4 or 5 (that being the time they are sent to the adult mental institutions… shiver). And for the older kids, when they hit age 16, they are not adoptable, ever, and are sent out on the street with a cup, a bowl and a fork and about $30. Nothing, no services past that, and the stigma that cannot go away in their cultures. You can imagine what happens next. It's just hopeless.

    I wish Julie had kept her comment up. It's a discussion worth having. :)

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  10. SonicGamer, that is awful! And, I didn't know that they had to put their photos on a listing even though the foster parents want them. That is ridiculous! Sigh...

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  11. Yes, where did she go? I hope she wasn't offended...it was a question that a lot of people probably have.

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  12. No, it's all good, no worries! I know Julie off-blog, too, ha ha. She didn't want to stir up controversy, but I think that a lot of people have that same question….

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  13. Could you explain more about why Anya is not in parental care? There is a statement in there about lack of education but it is not a clear explanation. Was she removed from her mother or did her mother relinquish her rights? Thanks.

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  14. Me.Us.She., I wish I could explain. I don't know any more information than that, but if you would like more information, you can contact the folks at Reece's Rainbow directly. A lot of the information is stated awkwardly if it is translated from the Russian, and I think that is what happened with Anya's profile information. RR might have more info, but they also might not. It depends on the region and the orphanage.

    Here is the page to ask a question:

    http://reecesrainbow.org/contact-rr

    Also, there are many moms and advocates for RR on the official RR facebook page, which is a GREAT place to ask questions and get answers about certain regions, certain children, and just generally navigate things:

    https://www.facebook.com/groups/officialreecesrainbow/

    I hope that helps! :)

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  15. Leila, who is adopting the 10-year-old in AZ? I didn't know he had a family interested! Yay!

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  16. JoAnna, a dear friend of mine who was in my RCIA class (that I taught) years ago! She and her husband have four children, and they have already talked to the SW and the team of folks, and want to go ahead! There are some issues to resolve, but they are preparing and I do believe this boy might become their son! One of their sons is my godchild, by the way. Greatest family you can imagine. :)

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